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The most important duty of a conservator is the most difficult to define, but the most important to perform: to consistency act in the best interest of the conservator. Courts do not simply establish conservatorships and assume that will happen. Since conservators wield considerable control over the mentally disabled person, the courts mandate vigorous reporting requirements.

For example once a conservatorship is established, the conservator must submit a care plan within sixty days of the establishment of the conservatorship.

Additionally if a conservatorship of the estate is established the conservator must submit an inventory of all the conservatee's assets within 90 days of establishing the conservatorship. The conservator must also provide annual or biannual accountings of the transactions made on behalf of the conservator. These reports must be detailed, accurate and include all income and expenditures for the Court's review.

Furthermore, conservators of the person are often required to submit periodic status reports about the conservatee and general information about what the conservator is doing on the conservatee's behalf. Courts will also periodically initiate investigations of the status of the conservatorship, the performance of the conservator, and the condition of the conservatee.

Conservators also have a duty to refrain from making decisions for the conservatee that are outside the scope of the conservatorship. An obvious example is if a person is a conservator of the estate for another, that conservator is not authorized to make medical decisions on behalf of the conservatee. There are many more subtle situations that can arise. The responsibility for acting within the court approved parameters of the conservatorship falls exclusively upon the conservator.

On the other hand, the conservator is generally entitled to reimbursement for some expenses incurred in the execution of the conservatorship. In some circumstances, courts approve compensation for time spent performing the duties. Courts, however, carefully scrutinize any petition for reimbursement for expenses and compensation for time. Conservators must keep highly detailed records in order for a court to approve either.




     
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